• Breastfeeding protects infants from developing chronic diseases
    Infants who were breastfed had a lower risk of developing non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) such as asthma, diabetes, and obesity later in life, according to a study presented at the recent European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) annual meeting held in Athens, Greece.
  • Depression lowers fertility in women

    Depression and depressive symptoms caused infertility in women, showed a North American study. However, psychotropic medications did not harm fertility, the researchers added.

  • BMD improvement, greater with denosumab than with zoledronic acid in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis
    Denosumab results to greater improvements in bone mineral density compared to zoledronic acid treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, based on an international, multicentre, randomised, double-blind trial.
  • Mode of delivery does not modify coeliac disease risk in infants

    Mode of delivery does not modify coeliac disease (CD) risk among infants born into at-risk families, report Italian researchers at the 49th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) 2016 in Athens, Greece.

  • Human milk composition similar in breastfeeding mothers with or without coeliac disease

    Human milk (HM) macronutrient, hormone and lipid content is similar in mothers with or without coeliac disease (CD), reported a study at the 49th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) 2016 in Athens, Greece.

  • Rotavirus acute gastroenteritis common among young children, breastfeeding may reduce risk

    Rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a common occurrence in children less than 2 years of age, though breastfed infants appear to have a lower risk of rotavirus-related diarrhoea, according to a study presented at the 49th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) 2016 held in Athens, Greece.

  • Vitamin D, omega-3 and iron consumption during pregnancy not related to coeliac disease in infants

    Vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FAs), and iron consumption during pregnancy is not associated with coeliac disease (CD) or coeliac disease autoimmunity (CDA), according to the TEDDY* study presented at the 49th meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) 2016 in Athens, Greece.

  • Vulval Cancer

    Vulval cancer is an uncommon condition. It accounts for only 3 to 4% of all gynaecological malignancies worldwide. The incidence is even lower in the Asian population with an age-standardized incidence rate of less than one in 100,000 women. It is predominantly a disease of postmenopausal women. Around 90% of vulval cancers are squmaous cell carcinoma (SCC). Other histology includes melanomas, adenocarcinoma (arising from the Bartholin’s gland or extra-mammary Paget’s disease), basal cell carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma. This review article focuses mainly on squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Aprepitant lessens chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in gynaecological cancer patients
    Aprepitant is effective in lessening nausea and vomiting in Japanese gynaecological cancer patients receiving paclitaxel and carboplatin combination chemotherapy, as reported in a multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomised study. 
  • Valethamate bromide and drotaverine increases cervical dilatation rate during labour
    Valethamate bromide and drotaverine are effective as cervical dilators to shorten the active phase of the first stage of labour, based on a prospective study.